Field Trips & Community Engagement

CALENDAR

DIRECTIONS

Educational Programs for All Ages

Visit us in Eureka, Missouri for a field trip, or we’ll come to you – in person or virtually.

Our efforts to raise awareness about wolves and their essential role in the wild has never been more important – or more urgent. Wolves are both apex predators and keystone species, meaning they play a disproportionately important role in keeping entire ecosystems in balance.

If you share our passion for these amazing animals and the places they call home, we hope you’ll utilize these curriculum-based education programs.

Ways to Learn With Us

Field Trips

Classroom Visits

Assembly Outreaches

Virtual Visits

Educational Event Booths

Education Programs

Our educational programs are available as a multiple-visit bundle or individually. These STEM-focused themes were developed to encourage inquiry-based learning for groups of all ages and inspire empathy towards animals.

We also offer programs designed for English Language Arts and Social Emotional Learning curriculum standards. Explore our programs below.

Animals of the Endangered Wolf Center

All Ages

Wolves, foxes, African painted dogs, and maned wolves, oh my! During this 90-minute field trip, guests will enjoy a guided tour of animals from eight unique species of wild canids (animals in the dog family) in their natural environment while learning about each species. Focus will be placed on history, captivating stories, and the important role these animals play in a healthy ecosystem.

This field trip is available June-March.

Wolves, foxes, African painted dogs, and maned wolves, oh my! Your group will learn all about the eight species of canids (animals in the dog family) at the EWC by viewing photos, interacting with tangible biofacts, and learning what you can do to help the endangered species in our care. Focus will be placed on history, captivating stories, and the important role these animals play in a healthy ecosystem.

  • Next Generation Science K-ESS3-3 Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on the land, water, air and/or other living things in the local environment. 
  • Next Generation Science 2-LS4-1 Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats.
  • Next Generation Science 4-LS1-1 Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, and reproduction. 
  • Next Generation Science MS-LS1-4 Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
  • Next Generation Science HS-LS4-5 Evaluate the evidence supporting claims that changes in environmental conditions may result in (1) increases in the number of individuals of some species, (2) the emergence of new species over time, and (3) the extinction of other species.

Animals in My Backyard

K – 12th Grade

Did you know that the American red wolf is native to Missouri? Historically, we could have had American red wolves right in our backyards! During this program, we invite you to join us as we investigate other native animals you might find in your backyard, learn about their important roles in the environment, and see our conservation efforts at work by viewing some of our animals.

This field trip is available June-March.

What lives in your backyard? What can you do to help your local wildlife? Students will explore these questions and more with this action-inspiring program. They will learn about the large variety of wildlife that may live around them while discussing how everything is dependent upon each other. 

  • Next Generation Science K-ESS3-1 Use a model to represent the relationship between the needs of different plants and animals (including humans) and the places they live.
  • Next Generation Science K-ESS3-3 Communicate solutions that will reduce the impact of humans on the land, water, air, and/or other living things in the local environment. 
  • Next Generation Science 2-LS4-1 Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats. 
  • Next Generation Science 3-LS4-3 Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all. 
  • Next Generation Science MS-LS2-1 Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence for the effects of resource availability on organisms and populations of organisms in an ecosystem.

Animal Behavior

6th – 12th Grade

Why do wolves howl? Why do some birds dance? Find the answers to these questions and more by joining us for our animal behavior field trip! This program includes participating in classroom activities, playing an animal husbandry game, and observing the behaviors of the animals that live at the EWC. During our breeding season in January and February, students also will help our staff observe the breeding behaviors of our resident wolves.

This field trip is available June-March.

Why do wolves howl? Why do some birds dance? Find the answers to these questions and more. Wolves get their point across with body language and sometimes even a noise or two.  This program gives students the opportunity to explore the different types of communication wolves and other animals use to express themselves. The students will even get the chance to experience what it’s like to communicate without words.

  • Next Generation Science MS-LS1-4  Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively. [Clarification Statement: Examples of behaviors that affect the probability of animal reproduction could include nest building to protect young from cold, herding of animals to protect young from predators, and vocalization of animals and colorful plumage to attract mates for breeding. Examples of animal behaviors that affect the probability of plant reproduction could include transferring pollen or seeds, and creating conditions for seed germination and growth. Examples of plant structures could include bright flowers attracting butterflies that transfer pollen, flower nectar and odors that attract insects that transfer pollen, and hard shells on nuts that squirrels bury.]

Caught in a Food Web

3rd – 5th Grade

Everybody eats! This program explores the concept of interdependence in the ecosystem. Students will be challenged to determine what role a variety of plants and animals play in the balancing act of life as well as learn how energy flows in ecosystems. We’ll discuss trophic cascades, create a fun and tangled food web, and visit some of our resident canids who paint perfect examples of energy transference in the wild.

This field trip is available June-March.

From a blade of grass to a bird in the sky and the person sitting next to you, we all have a very important role in the world. This program explores the concept of interdependence in the ecosystem. Students will be challenged to determine what role a variety of plants and animals play in the balancing act of life as well as learn how energy flows in ecosystems.

  • Next Generation Science 5-LS2-1 Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.

Home Sweet Habitat

K-2nd Grade

What is a habitat? What does every living thing need to survive? This program starts by examining how similar and different our needs are compared to other animals. During a nature walk students will take the scenic route down to visit the animals. Be sure to keep your eyes peeled for signs of wildlife! Who might live here, there, or everywhere? 

This field trip is available June-March.

  • Next Generation Science K-LS1-1 Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive. [Clarification Statement: Examples of patterns could include that animals need to take in food but plants do not; the different kinds of food needed by different types of animals; the requirement of plants to have light; and, that all living things need water].

Tracking and Trekking

All Ages – This field trip is available in April & May.

Did you know that some wolves have a chance to join wild packs less than two weeks after they are born in zoos like ours? Keeping tabs on where wild wolf families spend their time in protected recovery areas is one of the most valuable tools scientists have to accomplish the overarching goal of maintaining healthy packs of wolves and fostering puppies into their dens.

Learn how the Endangered Wolf Center teams up with other organizations in our amazing conservation efforts. Don’t miss this opportunity to take a hike, learn how our Animal Care team checks on newborn pups, and participate in a hands-on reenactment of wolf tracking.

Note: This field trip is available in April and May, and does not include viewing animals

  • National Health Education Standards 1.2.5 Identify practices and behaviors that prevent or reduce health risks.
  • Next Generation Science MS-LS1-4 Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
  • Next Generation Science HS-LS4-6 Create or revise a simulation to test a solution to mitigate adverse impacts of human activity on biodiversity.

Poetry in Nature

All Ages – Available June-March as a field trip only.

Nature has always been a source of inspiration for authors and poets. Now it’s your turn to immerse your senses in all nature has to offer and let your creative juices flow. See the animals who call the Endangered Wolf Center home, take a walk through the woods, and try your hand at several types of poetry.

Anti-Bullying

K-2nd Grade – Available as a field trip, outreach, or virtual program.
Field trips are available June-March.

Bullying is an issue faced by people of all ages. But are only humans bullied? Learn how stories and hurtful names, like the big bad wolf, caused people to hunt wolves to near extinction and how changing people’s views are now helping wolves return to the wild. Teach students to be kind with not only animals, but each other, to help put an end to bullying for everyone. Includes story time with a book written by one of our volunteers.

  • National Health Education Standards 2.2.1 Identify family influences on health behaviors.
  • National Health Education Standards 2.2.2 Explain how school personnel (eg, teachers, custodians, bus drivers, food service workers) influence healthy behaviors.
  • National Health Education Standards 2.5.2 Describe how peers influence health behaviors.
  • National Health Education Standards 4.2.1 Identify how effective interpersonal communication can benefit personal health and well-being.
  • National Health Education Standards 4.2.4 Demonstrate how to tell a trusted adult when feeling threatened, harmed, or unsafe.
  • National Health Education Standards 4.2.6 Demonstrate how to communicate kindness, empathy, compassion, and care toward others.
  • National Health Education Standards 4.5.3 Demonstrate how to effectively identify and communicate needs, wants, and feelings in healthy ways.
Field Trip Prices
There is a non-refundable $100 deposit required to schedule a field trip.
The final payment is due 2 weeks before the program. Discounts are available for Title I schools.
One adult chaperone is required for every 10 students.
Field Trip Group Rates (including students, teachers, and chaperones)
1-25 people – $175
26-50 people – $350
51-75 people – $525
76-100 people – $700
For dates and reservations, please complete the request form below. For any questions call 636-938-5900 or email [email protected].
Outreach and Booth Prices

Classroom & Assembly Outreaches | $175 each (or $75 virtual)

Outreach booth for up to 2 hours | $400

Outreach booth for each additional hour | $200

Please contact the office to customize a program for your classroom needs. If you have any special requests or would like additional information please call 636-938-5900 or email us at [email protected].

GROUP SIZE

Field trips and classroom programs are best suited for groups of up to 30 children and adults. Larger groups may be divided to optimize their educational experience.

Assembly and booth outreach visits are for an unlimited number of attendees and have the option for a visit from one of our Animal Ambassadors.

LENGTH

Our curriculum-based outreach and virtual education programs run 45-60 minutes each, depending on the presence of an Animal Ambassador.

Field Trips last 1.5-2 hours.

RESERVATIONS

Reservations are non-refundable and date changes are subject to availability. Please complete request form below.

SERVICE ANIMALS

At this time, we regret that we are unable to accommodate service animals during a tour. If you or a group member have a special need or mobility need, please contact us in advance.

Have the Endangered Wolf Center join your next event.

Whether it’s for a few hours or a whole weekend, we will educate your guests about endangered wolves and foxes, the incredible work done to save them from extinction, and how they can help.

Guests will have the opportunity to explore tactile biofacts, such as real wolf fur and a radio collar used to track wild animals.

Providing information about the ages of guests and the theme of your event may allow us to bring a fun activity!

Ready to book your field trip or educational outreach program? Get in touch with us to customize your experience.

Request a Field Trip

Outreach Request

Request a Vitrual Field Trip