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NPR story on our volunteers & breeding observations

Posted by on Feb 19, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on NPR story on our volunteers & breeding observations

NPR report 2 19 16

Mary Delach Leonard of St. Louis Public Radio (KWMU 90.7 FM), the St. Louis affiliate for NPR, visited the Endangered Wolf Center several times in January and February to report on our volunteers and their role in a decades-old breeding research program. Here’s a link to her story: http://tinyurl.com/EWConNPR

“Painted Dogs” as Super Bowl champs?

Posted by on Feb 17, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on “Painted Dogs” as Super Bowl champs?

Greg collar
African painted dogs might just as well appoint Greg Rasmussen as their official ambassador to the United States.

Rasmussen, the founder and executive director of Painted Dog Research Trust in Zimbabwe, is currently on a 22-city, 49-day tour of the United States, with a quick hop into Canada. He’s spending four nights in St. Louis, with visits to the Endangered Wolf Center and the Saint Louis Zoo.

On Tuesday night, Rasmussen championed on behalf of African painted dogs at the Endangered Wolf Center 2016 Speaker Series. More than three dozen people attended the talk.

“They have an incredible social system,” Rasmussen said. “There’s no hierarchy, no fighting, no leadership struggles,” he said, contrasting that to the presidential campaign taking place in the United States.

“Their teamwork is the best. If we could put them in the Super Bowl, they’d win every year. We ought to have a Super Bowl team called the Painted Dogs.”

Painted dogs, he said, operate in a true democracy. “Puppies will have chosen their leader by the time they are 12 months old. One in every pack is a little more adventurous, a little bolder, with true leadership qualities.” Size and strength are not the keys to becoming the pack’s alpha, Rasmussen said.

About 5,000 African painted dogs are in Africa today, down from perhaps a million dogs a century ago. Their story, he said, parallels what happened to wolves in the United States.

For the most part, they’ve fallen victim to efforts to exterminate them. Originally, Rasmussen said, they were known as tricolored dogs. But “the ranchers who hated them called them wild dogs,” he said, because it’s hard to whip up a frenzy to exterminate “tricolored dogs.”

That took place, he said, even though there is no record of an African painted dog ever attacking a human.

Rasmussen’s efforts in Zimbabwe – first as founder of Painted Dog Conservation and currently at Painted Dog Research Trust – are paying off. “Zimbabwe is the only place in the world where we successfully stopped the shooting of painted dogs.”

His current U.S. trip is also meeting with success. Before arriving in St. Louis on Monday, Feb. 15, 2016, Rasmussen met with a businessman in Ames, Iowa, who has agreed to provide solar power for collars for tracking painted dogs in the wild. On Tuesday, Rasmussen exchanged emails with a St. Louis businessman who wants to provide belting to make the lightweight collars. “They’re not doing this for business,” Rasmussen said. “They’re doing it because they care.”

He said Apple, Google and software companies are also working on the effort to improve tracking collars for painted dogs in the wild. “They want to help conservation,” he said.

The current prototype of collar is about 90 percent effective, he said, including small metal protrusions on the front that can free dogs that get trapped in snare wire.

Snares pose a huge threat to painted dogs in the wild, Rasmussen said, accounting for about 27 percent of their deaths. (70 percent are killed by farmers; 3 percent die of natural causes.)

The wire snares aren’t intended to kill painted dogs. They are placed by mercenaries trying to kill and ship large quantities of meat.

Rasmussen has concocted a clever means of battling the snares. Local villagers are paid to fashion art out of the snare wire, and those pieces are sold, with some of the profits going to the artisans. “It provides income for the community.”

And now, he said, he’s paying a bonus to those who provide their own snare wire, which encourages locals to find and dismantle illegal snare traps. Ultimately, he said, that will be more effective than paying for anti-poaching patrols.

Rasmussen brought snare art to be sold in the Endangered Wolf Center’s Celeste Ruwwe Gift Shop. Proceeds will be split among the non-profit Endangered Wolf Center and the locals in Zimbabwe who make the art.

The Speaker Series event was held at Washington University’s Tyson Research Center Living Learning Center. The Endangered Wolf Center is located on the Tyson property in Eureka, about 20 miles southwest of St. Louis. All proceeds from his talk directly benefit the Mexican wolves, red wolves, maned wolves, swift foxes, fennec foxes and African painted dogs living at the Endangered Wolf Center. The Center has three painted dogs, Dillon, a 9-year-old female, and 13-year-old brothers Tsavo and Dogo.

Job opening for Summer Camp counselor

Posted by on Jan 21, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Job opening for Summer Camp counselor

Organization: Endangered Wolf Center (AZA Member)
Location: Eureka, Missouri, United States
Job or Internship: Temporary, Seasonal Job

Job Description
: Summer Camp Counselor
Reports to: Youth Programs Coordinator

Job Summary:
Responsible for assisting the Youth Programs Coordinator in the planning and preparation of all five Summer Wolf Camp sessions. This position will be responsible for carrying out the day-to-day activities of camp. Candidate must be comfortable leading multiple outdoor activities and supervising large groups of children.
This is a temporary, seasonal position.
Candidates must be able to work the following dates, for 40 hours each week.
June 13-17
June 20-24
July 11-15
July 18-22
July 25-29

Responsibilities:
• Assist the Youth Programs Coordinator with the planning and preparation of five sessions of Summer Wolf Camp.
• Oversee day-to-day activities of Summer Wolf Camp, including long nature hikes, crafts, tours of the animal enclosures, games and many other activities.
• Perform other duties as assigned.

Required Qualifications:
• Two-years of college at minimum.
• Experience supervising children.
• Ability to lead and participate in long hikes in hot weather conditions.
• Flexible schedule.
• Ability to establish and maintain good working relationships with other
departments.

Preferred Qualifications:
• Two-years of college at minimum toward an education degree, wildlife biology degree or other related field.
• CPR/First Aid Certified.
• Previous camp experience.
• Knowledge of the Endangered Wolf Center, Docent status at the Center would be very helpful.

Pay will be discussed in person. Please send your resume and cover
letter
to Ashley Rearden, Director of Education, at [email protected] or by mail to P.O. Box 760 Tyson Valley Rd. Eureka, MO 63025.

The Endangered Wolf Center is an equal opportunity employer.

Trivia Night 2017 will be Feb. 10

Posted by on Jan 14, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Trivia Night 2017 will be Feb. 10

Make plans now to be at our Trivia Night 2017, which will be held Friday, Feb. 10, again at the Kirkwood Community Center.

The Endangered Wolf Center Trivia Night 2016 was a huge success.

More than 300 people turned out for the evening of fun Friday, March 18, at the Kirkwood Community Center. About $30,000 was raised. The top-scoring table had 93 correct out of 100 questions. Two teams got 92 correct, with a tiebreaker of predicted team score deciding second place.
Prizes were awarded for the top three scoring tables. In addition, there were raffle prizes, door prizes, a 50-50 raffle and a silent auction. Free Anheuser-Busch beer, courtesy of Grey Eagle Distributing, was provided to guests over age 21. Free soda, water and snacks were provided as well.
We’d like to thank the following sponsors and donors:

Event Sponsors:
Anonymous
Jay Smith

Gift Shop Sponsors:
Brncic Family
Harvest Plaza Animal Hospital & St. Charles Animal Hospital and Clinic
Virgil and Sandra VanTrease

Beverage Sponsors:
Anonymous
Duggan Contracting
Craig and Denise Austin

Round Sponsors:

Sponsors of Round 1: Didn’t You Used to Be?
The Broom Family
CHE Consulting, Inc.
Penny and Connor

Sponsors of Round 2: Animal Song Titles (Music round)
Jo Anna Dale
In Memory of Dora

Sponsors of Round 3: Road Trip
Drury Inn & Suites
Lesley and Don Gottlinger
Bill and Julie Gerlach

Sponsors of Round 4: Galloping Gourmets (Jelly Belly taste test)
Celeste Ruwwe and Gerry Hufker
Celeste Ruwwe and Gerry Hufker
Celeste Ruwwe and Gerry Hufker

Sponsors of Round 5: Wild Wild Best
The Kostman Family
Maxine, Bradley, Bob, Trè, and Dorothy Mae
Cheryl Morrow

Sponsors of Round 6: Sports Through the Decades
In loving memory of Kevin (Cubby) Houska and Babs Nelson
Saint Louis Zoo Animal Health Department

Sponsors of Round 7: Hey, Aren’t You? (Cartoon animals)
Soulard Wolf Pack
Tana and Bill Settle
Vet Stop Animal Clinic

Sponsors of Round 8: Potpourri
Linda and Ruby Straubinger
Trueman’s Place
George and Lee Weber

Spring 2017 Operations Management Internship

Posted by on Jan 11, 2016 in Blog | Comments Off on Spring 2017 Operations Management Internship

Spring 2017 Operations Management Intern

The Endangered Wolf Center is seeking a student intern with an interest and aptitude in operations management, event planning, social media, marketing and communications to help develop and implement strategies in these areas and perform essential duties.

The position is unpaid. The internship can start as early as February and continue through the spring semester. Days and hours are flexible according to the intern’s academic schedule, but should generally fall during regular business hours.

The Endangered Wolf Center is a non-profit 501c(3) located in Eureka, Missouri, 20 miles southwest of St. Louis. The Center’s mission is to preserve and protect Mexican wolves, red wolves and other wild canid species, with purpose and passion, through carefully managed breeding, reintroduction and inspiring education programs.

Specific duties of the internship include:

• Assisting the Director of Operations in attending to administrative, logistical and other duties necessary for the organization’s day-to-day operations.
• Helping plan and stage major fundraising events, including the Endangered Wolf Center’s annual open house, trivia night and charity polo match.
• Helping to draft and establish written Operations protocols.
• Developing and posting content on our various social media sites.
• Expanding our social media presence.
• Developing and posting content on our website.
• Publicizing our tours, events and other activities on our website and on other websites.
• Developing and implementing promotions designed to attract more visitors to the Center, and tracking the success of such efforts.
• Assisting in the planning, editing and production of our print and online newsletters.
• Writing and distributing news releases to media outlets.

Qualifications:

• Candidates must be actively enrolled in an undergraduate program at an accredited university in the St. Louis Metropolitan Area.
• Candidates must have demonstrated an aptitude or success in operations, event planning, social media, marketing and communications, and should be prepared to submit examples upon request.
• Candidates must be able to establish and maintain good working relationships with all departments at the Center.
• Candidates must be adept at external communications.
• Candidates should be acquainted with or quickly able to learn Microsoft Office applications, such as Excel, Word and PowerPoint.

Benefits:

• Strengthen your resume by working for our non-profit conservation organization, which is certified by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums.
• Gain the satisfaction of helping preserve and reintroduce to the wild some of the most endangered species of wolves in the world.
• Learn management skills and office procedures.
• Explore career options.
• Obtain a letter of recommendation from our Executive Director after successfully completing the internship.

To apply:

• Please send your cover letter and resume to Steve Parker, Operations Director, at [email protected] or by mail to P.O. Box 760, Eureka, MO. 63025. No phone calls please.
• The Endangered Wolf Center is an equal opportunity employer.

Organization: Endangered Wolf Center (AZA Member)
Location: 6750 Tyson Valley Road, Eureka, Mo., 63025
Job or Internship: Unpaid Internship
Job Title: Operations Management Intern
Reports to: Director of Operations (directly) and Executive Director.

Complete list of our 2016 dates

Posted by on Dec 23, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off on Complete list of our 2016 dates

i-R7rnfqk-Si-XrjtnqZ-SA complete list of our major events, evening programs and camps appears below. Get out your calendars and reserve the dates now!

MAJOR EVENTS

Trivia Night
March 18
Kirkwood Community Center

Volunteer Appreciation Dinner
April 10
TBD

Wolves & Wine Auction
June 11
Central West End

Members’ Day
June 25
Endangered Wolf Center

Charity Polo Match
Aug. 27
TBD

Wolf Fest
Oct. 8
Endangered Wolf Center

Holiday Boutique
Dec. 3
Endangered Wolf Center

Volunteer Holiday Potluck
Dec. 13
Endangered Wolf Center

CAMPS

Winter Camp
Jan. 2

Spring Camp
March 14
March 21

Summer Camp
June 13-17
June 20-24
July 11-15
July 18-22
July 25-29 (overnight on the 28th)

Fall Camp
Oct. 15

Mini Camps
April 23
May 21

Messy Play Days
June 12
July 17
Aug. 21

EVENING PROGRAMS

Evening events all start at 7 p.m.
Howls marked with an asterisk (*) are for ages 21 and up

January
8- Foxy Friday*
23- Campfire Howl

February
13- Valentine’s Day Wine & Chocolate Howl*
27- Campfire Howl

March
4- Foxy Friday*
12- Campfire Howl
19- Campfire Howl
24- Happy Hour Wine & Cheese Howl*
26- Campfire Howl

May
5-Cinco de Mayo* (fennec foxes, no howl)

June
17- Foxy Friday*
18- Hotdog Howl

July
1- Hotdog Howl
9- Margaritas & Mexican Wolves Howl*
15 – Hotdog Howl
23- Hotdog Howl
29- Foxy Friday*

August
5 – Hotdog Howl
13- Hotdog Howl
19- Foxy Friday*

September
3- Campfire Howl
9- Foxy Friday*
17- Campfire Howl
24- Campfire Howl
30- Wine & Cheese Howl*

October
1- Campfire Howl
13- Oktoberfest Beer & Brats Howl*
15- Campfire Howl
21- Campfire Howl
29- Howl-o-Ween Howl

November
5- Campfire Howl
11- Foxy Friday*
18- Campfire Howl
26- Campfire Howl

December
10- Campfire Howl
16- Foxy Friday*

Wolves and cheetahs face similar challenges

Posted by on Dec 4, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off on Wolves and cheetahs face similar challenges

They are half a world apart, but the story of wolves in the United States and cheetahs in Africa is strikingly similar.

Recently, Dr. Laurie Marker, the founder and executive director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund, and Virginia Busch, the executive director of the Endangered Wolf Center, sat down to discuss the challenges of saving endangered cheetahs, wolves and other predators.  To mark International Cheetah Day  (Friday, Dec. 4), the two organizations have posted videos of their conversation.

“Whenever I hear you speak about how important top predators are to the African landscape,” Busch told Dr. Marker, “I think, my gosh, I am saying the same story about wolves in the U.S.”

TCCFhe Cheetah Conservation Fund, now celebrating its 25th year in existence, envisions a world where cheetahs and humans live in harmony.  The Endangered Wolf Center’s vision calls for a world where wolves “… coexist with humans and thrive in their native habitats …”

Watch Dr. Laurie Marker and Virginia Busch discuss their organizations’ missions and strategies.

Virginia Busch, our executive director, and Laurie Marker, executive director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund, offer insights and solutions for human and wildlife conflicts in wolf and cheetah conservation.

Watch Dr. Laurie Marker discuss the Cheetah Conservation Fund.

Laurie Marker, executive director of the Cheetah Conservation Fund, discusses the challenges of wildlife conservation and finding harmony for humans and predators.

Center named among the best places for kids

Posted by on Nov 20, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off on Center named among the best places for kids

kids out #2The Endangered Wolf Center is ranked No. 2 on the Kids Out and About St. Louis 2015 list of the Top 20 Places to Take Kids in St. Louis, finishing behind only the St. Louis Zoo.
The rankings are made by the public in balloting that ended in June on the Kids Out and About website, www.saintlouis.kidsoutandabout.com.
In 2014, the Center was ranked No. 4 on the Top 20 list.
For the second year in a row, Kids Out and About had an information booth at Wolf Fest, our annual open house, and shared ideas about other great places for kids in the St. Louis region.

Shop & help nature at the same time

Posted by on Nov 10, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off on Shop & help nature at the same time

Our annual Holiday Boutique on Saturday, Dec. 5, 2015, was a big success, perfect for those who love nature and also love to shop. While that event is over, you can still fulfill your holiday shopping needs with a visit to our Celeste Ruwwe Gift Shop.

The Gift Shop is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. It is also open during our weekend tours and events. Admission to the gift shop is free.

Looking for something unique? How about an original painting done by our maned wolves, African painted dogs or swift foxes? In addition to those one-of-a-kind items, there’s a wide variety of jackets, T-shirts, hoodies, plush animals, jewelry, posters, books and DVDs. And lots more. Two other wonderful gift ideas are to give a membership or adopt a wolf in the name of someone special.

The Endangered Wolf Center is located on the grounds of Washington University’s Tyson Research Center, at 6750 Tyson Valley Road, Eureka, MO 63025. Just come to the front gate and you’ll be directed to the gift shop.

For more information, call 636-938-5900.

Make plans for Members’ Day 2016

Posted by on Nov 4, 2015 in Blog | Comments Off on Make plans for Members’ Day 2016

Pumpkin tossMembers’ Day 2015 was a huge success, with more than 400 people taking part.

Next year’s Members’ Day will be Saturday June 25, 2016. On that day, the Center closes to the public so that members can be treated to a special day of fun and appreciation. If you’re not yet a member, please call 636-938-9306 to join or email [email protected] ​or visit the “Join” page on this website.​

This year’s Members’ Day​ was Saturday, Nov​. 7. It featured three separate events​ based on the level of membership​.

​The first event, Dine with the Keepers​, lasted from 11 a.m. ​to 12:30 p.m. Members at the Animal Keeper level or higher enjoyed an outdoor dining experience ​​with our Animal Care staff, with delicious food ​provided by Brio Tuscan Grille.​ About 200 guests listened intently as our animal keepers provided updates on the individual animals who live here. The morning session ended with some lucky guests being selected to toss pumpkins filled with enrichment items to the animals.

Board Chairman Jeremiah Dellas welcomed the crowd, and Director of Development Rachel Broom ran through an impressive list of 2015 accomplishments made possible by the Center’s Board, staff, volunteers and members.

​The second segment was our Daytime Celebration from 1 ​to 4 p.m. All members were invited to enjoy the beautiful fall day filled with special activities while viewing some of the world’s most endangered animals. Guests at the afternoon session enjoyed free food and drinks, including Anheuser-Busch beer donated by Grey Eagle Distributors.

​The final fun on Members’ Day was our Evening ​Campfire ​Wolf ​Howl​, which​ started at 7​ ​p.m.​ Guests relaxed around a cozy campfire, listened to stories that portray wolves in a positive light, and participated in our famous “wolf howl.” ​

To get in on the fun next year, please call 636-938-9306 to become a member or email [email protected] ​or visit the “Join” page on this website.​

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